Fidelity to the Word
Our Lord and His Holy Apostles at the Last Supper


A blog dedicated to Christ Jesus our Lord and His True Presence in the Holy Mystery of the Eucharist


Stir up our hearts, O Lord, to prepare the way of Thine only-begotten Son: that through His coming we may attain to serve Thee with purified minds. Who liveth and reigneth, with God the Father, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, through all the ages of ages.

Thursday, April 06, 2006

Random notes - Unused Liturgy Links

(for searching, not for reading)

Links not used in this thread

Traditional Latin Mass

Coptic Liturgy of St. Gregory of Nazianzus:
"Take, drink of it all of you. For this is My Blood of the new covenant, which will be shed for you and for many, to be given for the remission of sins. Do this in remembrance of Me."

Liturgy of the Assyrian Church of the East
Our Lord Jesus, in the same night in which He was betrayed, took bread and blessed and broke it, and said: "Take, eat: This is My Body which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me." Likewise, after they had supped, He took the cup, saying: "This cup is the New Testament in My Blood: This do as often as you drink of it, in remembrance of me."
...and may there come, O My Lord, Your Holy Spirit, and rest upon this offering of Thy servants and bless it and hollow it and that it may be to us, O My Lord, for the pardon of offences and for the forgiveness of sins and for the great hope of resurrection from the dead and for new life in the kingdom of heaven, with all those who have been well-pleasing to Thee. And for all this great and marvellous dispensation towards us, we give Thee thanks and glorify Thee without ceasing in Thy Church redeemed by the precious blood of Thy Christ, with open mouths and unveiled faces.

SYRO-MALABAR QURBANA - THE ORDER OF RAZA (Most Solemn Form) - TAKSHA D'RAZÉ [PDF-English]
HALLOWING OF MAR THEODORE THE INTERPRETER OF THE DIVINE SCRIPTURES
And likewise also over the cup, He gave thanks, and blessed + + +
He makes thrice the sign of the cross on it
gave it to them and said, This is My Blood of the new covenant which is shed for many
for the remission of sins.

HALLOWING OF MAR NESTORIUS, PATRIARCH OF CONSTANTINOPLE
He blessed + + +
He makes thrice the sign of the cross on it
gave thanks, drank and gave to His disciples, saying: Take and drink of it all of
you. This is My Blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the
forgiveness of sins.

(Mar Theodore)
In the same way also he gave thanks over the cup and gave to them and said, This is my blood of the new testament which is shed for many for the forgiveness of sins.


The Nestorian Liturgy
THE HALLOWING OF MAR THEODORE THE INTERPRETER
In the same way also he gave thanks over the cup and gave to them and said, This is my blood of the new testament which is shed for many for the forgiveness of sins.

Need to find:
The Divine Liturgy of The Syro Malankara Catholic Church


from a Sarum missal
[is this the same as the traditional Mass consecration?]
Hic est enim calix Sanguinis mei novi et æterni testamenti, mysterium fidei, qui pro vobis et pro multis effundetur in remissionem peccatorum.


From the newsgroup soc.religion.christian:
no "for many" for the wine, but for the bread:



TEXT OF DE SACRAMENTISROMAN CANONROMAN CANON
(about 400 AD) (1962 AD)(English translation)
Qui pridie quam pateretur, in sanctis manibus suis accepit panem, respexit in caelum ad te, sancte Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus, Gratias agens, benedixit, fregit, fractum quae apostolis suis et discipulis suis tradidit dicens: accipite et edite ex hoc omnes: hoc est enim corpus meum, quod pro multis confringetur. Qui pridie quam pateretur, accepit panem in sanctas ac venerabiles manus suas: et elevatis oculis in ccelum, ad Te Deum Patrem suum omnipotentem, tibi gratias agens, benedixit, fregit, deditque discipulis suis dicens: accipite et manducate ex hoc omnes: hoc est enim corpus meum.Who, the day before He suffered, took bread into His holy and venerable hands, and having raised His eyes to Heaven, unto Thee, O God, His Almighty Father, giving thanks to Thee, He blessed it, broke it, and gave it to His disciples, saying: Take ye all and eat of this: For this is my Body.
De Sacramentis:
"For this is my Body, which will be broken for many"
or "Take ye all and eat of this: for this is My body, which is broken for many."


In an historical study of the Canon of the Latin Mass, V. L. Kennedy presents what he identifies as the Roman Canon in use at the end of the fourth century, as it is recorded in the De Sacramentis: "In all probability, it is the work of St. Ambrose of Milan (died 397), and, as the author tells us he follows Rome in all things, we have the Roman Canon of that period."40 Again he says: "We have in the De sacramentis a text that was certainly in use at Rome at the end of the fourth century."41 According to Joseph Jungmann, "this work of Ambrose is a stenographic report of his preaching, which was not restricted by the laws of the arcana, in marked contrast to the De Mysteriis, and could thus give us such precious accounts."42 In the text of the De Sacramentis, the form for the consecration of the bread is this: "Hoc est enim corpus meum, quod pro multis confringetur" ("For this is my Body, which will be broken for many"). And the form for the consecration of the wine is as follows: "Hic est enim sanguis meus" ("For this is my Blood).43 If the text of the De sacramentis presents the standard forms in use in Rome at that time, the now traditional forms for the consecration of the Sacred Species, as presented in the Missale Romanum of Pope St. Pius V, probably date back no further than the fifth century, before which time their wording was notably different. According to the De Sacramentis, the expression which will be broken for many was included in the form for the consecration of the bread, and the words chalice of and those expressing the fruits of the Passion were not in the form for the consecration of the wine.

Many people do not believe Ambrose wrote de Sacramentis

De Sacramentis, St. Ambrose
De Sacramentis: 9
Hic est enim sanguis meus.
For this is My Blood.

A COLLECTION OF HOMILIES ON THE SACRAMENTS, NOT A LITURGY
The "De Sacramentis" may possibly be the version by a shorthand-writer of the course which the saint himself edited under the title "De Mysteriis". In any case the "De Sacramentis" (whether by Ambrose or not) has a freshness and naiveté which is wanting in the certainly authentic "De Mysteriis".

Like DE MYSTERIIS, Ambrose's De sacramentis explains the sacrament of baptism and the eucharist to neophytes, but adds a commentary on the seven petitions of the Lord's Prayer and a discussion of the virtues of prayer. On the relationship between De sacramentis and De mysteriis, see T. Thompson 1950 (pp 3-9). Its authenticity has been questioned, but is defended by Faller (CSEL 73.13*-16*). The work is also edited in SChr 25.

From the Ecole Initiative:
The dogmatic texts are his core works on the Nicene faith and on the Holy Spirit, plus additional pieces on related themes; there are also homilies on the sacraments (De sacramentis), a redacted version of the same series (De mysteriis), and a work on penitence (De paenitentia).

Among works more or less doubtful are De Sacramentis, admitted by the Benedictines, but rejected, and apparently on sufficient grounds, by Ihm.

Character, Authorship, and Date of the Treatise “On The Sacraments” (de Sacramentis)

The treatise On the Sacraments consists of six sermons delivered to the newly-baptized in Easter week. They deal with Baptism, Confirmation, the Eucharist, the Lord’s Prayer, and Prayer. The work is nearly related to de Mysteriis, which it closely follows, embodying and expanding most of its contents.

In his eucharistic teaching he follows Ambrose in his assertion of the operative power of the word of Christ in changing the elements into the body and blood of Christ.


What Ambrose says in De sacramentis was intended only for the newly baptized, not for readers in other places. That is why Ambrose so proudly can underline the fact that the church of Milan has preserved a part of the baptismal rite which had been left out in Rome.

Ambrose explains that the feet were washed while Joh 13 was read aloud. The reason for the rite is, according to him, not only the new life style which Jesus taught his disciples, but also that original sin came to man through Adam's foot through the serpent's bite.


Syrian Anaphoras:
© Syrian Orthodox Dioceses of North America and Canada. Reproduced with permission. No part of the material may be reproduced in any form or by any means, without written permission from the publisher.

Anaphora of St. James
Likewise, He took the Cup and when He had given thanks, He blessed + + and sanctified + and gave it to His holy disciples, and said: Take, drink of it, all of you. This is My Blood which for you and for many is shed and given for the remission of sins and for eternal life.

Anaphora of St. Mark
Likewise, also the cup blended with wine and water; He gave thanks, blessed + + and sanctified + and gave to His holy disciples, and said: This is My Blood of the New Covenant; take, drink of it all of you for your propitiation and that of all the true faithful and for everlasting life.

Anaphora of St. Peter
Likewise, the cup blended with wine and water, He blessed + + and sanctified + and gave to His holy apostles, and said: Take, drink of it all of you for the remission of offenses and for life eternal.

Anaphora of the Twelve Apostles (According to the Evangelist St. Luke)
Likewise, after they had eaten supper, He took the cup blended with wine and water. He blessed + + and sanctified + and, when He had tasted it, gave it to His disciples, saying: Take drink of it, all of you. This is My Blood of the new Covenant which is shed for you and for many for the remission of sins and for life everlasting.

Anaphora of St. John the Evangelist
After His mystical supper, He took the cup blended with wine and water and gave thanks unto it. He blessed + +, consecrated + and gave the company of His disciples,and said to them: This is My Blood. Take drink of it all of you. This is shed for the life of the world, and for the remission of offenses and the forgiveness of sins for all those who believe in Me, forever and ever.

Anaphora of St. Xystus
Likewise, also in the cup which by Him was signed, sanctified + + + and and given to His holy apostles, He gave us His propitiatory Blood for life eternal.
...
O Lord, have compassion on me, have compassion on me and all Your inheritance and be pleased as to sanctify these offerings by the descent of Your Holy Spirit Who eternally proceeds from You and substantially receives from Your Son.
...
And may He complete this cup to become the Blood + + + of Christ our God

Anaphora of St. Julius - The Bishop of Rome (+AD 365)
Likewise, the wine blended in the cup, after they had eaten supper, He blessed it + + and sanctified it + and gave it to the company of His disciples and said: Take and drink of It all of you; this is My Blood of the New Covenant which for your sake and for the sake of many is shed for the remission of debts, the forgiveness of sins and for life eternal.

Anaphora of St. John Chrysostom (+AD 440)
Likewise, He took the cup, He blessed + +, He sanctified + and gave His disciples, saying: Take, drink of it all of you for the remission of debts, the forgiveness of sins and for everlasting life.

Anaphora of St. Cyril - Patriarch of Alexandria (+AD 444)
He then blended wine and water in the cup of life. He blessed + +, sanctified + and gave it to the company of His disciples, and said: This is My Blood which seals and confirms the New Covenant of My death and invites you and many faithful for the forgiveness of sins and for life eternal.

Anaphora of St. Jacob of Sarugh - The Bishop of Batnan (+AD 521)
Likewise, after they had supper, He also blended the cup of life of wine and water and gave thanks and blessed + +, sanctified + and gave the assembly of His disciples and said to them: Take, drink of it all of you, this is the cup of the New Covenant in My Blood which for you and for many is shed and given for the forgiveness of sins and for life eternal.

Anaphora of St. Philoxenus of Mabbug (+AD 523)
Likewise, He blended the cup from wine and water, gave thanks, blessed + + and sanctified + and gave it to the very company of His holy disciples, saying: Take, drink of it all of you, this is My Blood which for your sake and for the sake of many is shed and given for the remission of sins and for life eternal.

Anaphora of St. Severius of Antioch - The Patriarch of Antioch (+AD 538)
Likewise also, he took the cup, after they had eaten supper, and when He mixed wine and water and gave thanks, He blessed + +, sanctified + and gave to His disciples, the apostles, saying: Take, drink of it all of you. This is My Blood of the New Covenant which is shed for you and for many and is given for the remission of sins and for life eternal.

Anaphora of Mar Dionysius Jacob Bar Salibi - The Bishop of Amid (+AD 1171)
And also the cup blended of wine and water, He blessed + + and sanctified + and completed as His Precious Blood of eternal life for those who receive it.
...
Have mercy upon me, O Lord, and send upon me and upon this Eucharist which has been offered Your Holy Spirit Who makes perfect all the Mysteries of the Church by His descent.
...
And may He change the mixture in this cup to the Blood + + + of Christ our God.


----------------------
Current Coptic rites:

Divine Liturgy of St. Basil [St. Bassillious the Great]:
here and here
Take, drink of it all of you. For this is my Blood for the new covenant which shall be shed for you and many, to be given for the remission of sins. Do this in remembrance of Me.

Divine Liturgy of St. Gregory:
Take, drink of it all of you. For this is My Blood of the new covenant, which will be shed for you and for many, to be given for the remission of sins. Do this in remembrance of Me.

Divine Liturgy of St. Cyril: [derived from Liturgy of St Mark]
Take, drink of it all of you, for this is My Blood of the new covenant which shall be shed for you and for many, to be given for the remission of sins. Do this in remembrance of Me.


The Divine Liturgy of the Holy Apostle and Evangelist Mark
After the same manner also, when He had supped, He took the cup of wine mingled with water, and lifting His eyes to Thee, His Father, our God, and the God of all, gave thanks; and when He had blessed and filled it with the Holy Spirit, gave it to His holy and blessed disciples and apostles, saying:-(Aloud.)Drink ye all of it.
For this is my blood of the new testament which is shed for you and for many, and distributed among you for the remission of sins.

---------------

Anaphora of Bishop Serapion of Thmuis

11.”Heaven is full, the earth is also full of thy sublime glory, O Lord of hosts. Extend thy power upon this sacrifice, and grant thy aid to its fulfillment; for it is to thee that we have offered this living victim, the unbloody sacrifice.
12. To thee have we offered this bread, the likeness of the body of thine only Son. This bread is the image of His holy body; for ‘the Lord Jesus on the night in which He was betrayed, took bread, broke it, and gave it to His disciples and said: Take and eat, this is my body, which shall be broken for you,’ for the remission of sins.
13. Therefore have we, by repeating the figure of His death, offered the bread and pray: By this sacrifice reconcile thyself with us all and have mercy upon us, O God of truth. And as this bread was scattered upon the hills and brought together into one, so do thou unite thy holy Church from every people and every land and every city and every village and house, and build up one living Catholic Church.
14. We have also offered the chalice, the symbol of the blood; for the Lord Jesus, ‘after He had supped, took the cup and said to His disciples: Take, drink, this is the new covenant, which is my blood, which shall be shed for the remission of sins.’ Therefore have we also offered the chalice, because we have consummated the symbol of the blood.
15. “Let thy holy Word (Logos), O God of truth, come down upon this bread, so that the bread may become the body of the Word, and on this chalice, so that the chalice may become the blood of Truth. And grant that all who partake of them, may receive the medicine of life, as a cure for all sickness and as an increase and progress in virtue, not, however, as judgment, O God of truth, nor as punishment and disgrace.

---------

The more eccentric consecrations have tended to fall by the wayside. Could this be the work of the Holy Spirit, guiding His church "to all truth"?

But when he comes, the Spirit of truth, he will guide you to all truth. He will not speak on his own, but he will speak what he hears, and will declare to you the things that are coming.

The versions of the Liturgy that omitted "for many" or used alternate wording occurred early and soon fell out of use (if they ever were in use).
NO, some still remain in use w/o 'for many', but these rites have other anaphoras with the words - Assyrian, Syrian, Ethipian

--------------------

We have, then, certain evidence that our St. James's Liturgy is the original local rite of Jerusalem. A further question as to its origin leads to that of its relation to the famous liturgy in the eighth book of the Apostolic Constitutions. That the two are related is obvious. (The question is discussed in ANTIOCHENE LITURGY.) It seems also obvious that the Apostolic Constitution rite is the older; St. James must be considered a later, enlarged, and expanded form of it. But the liturgy of the Apostolic Constitutions is not Palestinan, but Antiochene. The compiler was an Antiochene Syrian; he describes the rite he knew in the north, at Antioch. (This, too, is shown in the same article.) The St. James's Rite, then, is an a adaptation of the other (not necessarily of the very one we have in the Apostolic Constitutions, but of the old Syrian rite, of which the Apostolic Constitutions give us one version) made for local use at Jerusalem. Then it spread throughout the patriarcate. It must always be remembered that, till the Council of Ephesus (431)

==============================

Duplicates:

Liturgy of St. Germain [Germanus] of Paris (6th century Gallican Rite)
here and here


The Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom
here, here and here


Divine Liturgy of St. Basil (Coptic)


Syriac Antiochean Maronite Liturgy (Anaphora of the Twelve Apostles)
here and here
[for the second, choose 12 apostles anaphora]
[same for Sy. John Maron anaphora]


Chaldean Mass
here and here


Liturgy of St. Dionysius, Bishop of the Athenians
here and here


Syro-Malabar Church, founded by St. Thomas in 52 AD in India
Oostveen's Malabar Liturgy links
Qurbana - The Order of Raza
web page of J.P. Oostveen a Civil Engineering consultant in the Netherlands


The Liturgy of St. Mark
Variations in the Eucharistic Prayer
Anaphora of St. Mark
here and here


The Badarak (Divine Liturgy of the Armenian Church)
here and here


Anaphora of St. Hippolytus of Rome
here and here


Fr. Fessio says Canon of Hyppolytus was probably never used as a liturgical text because in the early days of the Church there was no final, written formalization of the liturgy, so this was an outline to be used by the celebrant.

Anaphora of St. James
here and here

==================

Look for these:

- Benedictine Rite
- Carmelite Rite (Carmelite Usage)
- Cistercian Rite
- Dominican Rite (Dominican Usage)
- Franciscan Rite
- Friars Minor Capuchin Rite
- Premonstratensian Rite

Bragan Usage
Carthusian Usage


The Byzantine Rite, used by the Orthodox and Byzantine Uniats in various languages.
* Albanian
* Bulgarian
* Byelorrussian [Belarussian]
* Greek
* Hungarian
* Italo-Albanian
* Krizevci [Byzantine Croatian Catholics - Language Old Slavonic]
* Melkite or Greek-Melkite (patriarchal)
* Rumanian [Romanian]
* Russian catholic [Language Old Slavonic]
* Ruthenian
* Slovak
* Ukrainian
* Yugoslavian


2. The Ambrosian Rite at Milan.

# The Lyonese Rite of the diocese of Lyons, France, now defunct, was once again a local variant of the Roman Rite, much as was the Sarum Use.
# The Nidaros Use, long defunct, based mainly on imported English liturgical books, used in pre-Reformation Norway.
# The Aquileia Rite, a defunct rite based in the former town in northern Italy.
# The Benevento Rite, a defunct rite originated in this city in Italy.

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